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What’s the next cupcake?

According to a Google trend report, the cupcake is the next cupcake. Confused? Everyone’s favourite mini cake has been the hottest dessert trend for the last decade; and trend forecasters have been waiting for the next big thing, and surprisingly, cupcakes are still top of the cake pops.
We think our sticky buns could take on the almighty cupcake, don’t you?

According to a Google trend report, the cupcake is the next cupcake.

cupcake

Confused? Everyone’s favourite mini cake has been the hottest dessert trend for the last decade; and forecasters have been waiting for the next big thing, and surprisingly, cupcakes are still top of the cake pops.

We think our sticky buns could take on the almighty cupcake, don’t you?

sticky bun

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Vii Chen – fruit and vegetable peel inspired tableware

We discovered the work of Taiwanese designer Vii Chen and loved the look of it. And the meaning behind the concept is even more to love.

“…tangible and intangible explanations between tactility are explored through production techniques in natural materials. ’peels’, includes a series of six geometric patterned ceramic cups that retain certain memories of a palpable interactions with certain fruits and vegetable skins. Literature reviews inform the idea of ‘ceremonial and memorial touch’ to generate a symbiotic emotion between users…”

vi chen

tangible and intangible
explanations between tactility are explored through production techniques in natural materials. ’peels’, includes a series
of six geometric patterned ceramic cups that retain certain memories of a palpable interactions with certain fruits and
vegetable skins. literature reviews inform the idea of ‘ceremonial and memorial touch’ to generate a symbiotic emotion
between use
Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Art, Food, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Eating at Pitt Cue Co

Our Susan Huxter has been travelling in The Big Smoke, and she stumbled on a delicious slice of British Americana, Pitt Cue Co.

pitt cue co

The limited menu is packed full of pig, served on metals trays in an intimate location just off London’s Carnaby Street. There are only a couple of things to order, but they have focused on doing them really well.

pitt cue

“They don’t take reservations and there are only 30 seats, so you have to queue,” says Susan. “The food is real, real and delicious. The night I went I had pulled pork and 25-month cured sirloin, cooked medium rare.”

Pitt Cue Co Ribs

Upstairs there’s also a cocktail bar with a focus on heavily-laced bourbon cocktails with bowls of pork scratchings to help soak them up.

Posted by: Le Quartier Français
Posted in: London, Travel, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

The dark arts of hamburgery

Are you obsessed with the ultimate burger? Well, then this voyeuristic site is for you: www.pornburger.me. Recently launched, the author’s mission statement, puts his purpose across simply: “My goal? In short; pure carnal pleasure. In long; to concoct, photograph, and devour one sin-tillating burger a week, as an exercise in both my culinary and photographic passions. Lets get weird.”

pornburger

P.s Bread & Wine make a killer burger: Wagyu burger, potato wedges, suet mayonnaise & Klein Rivier parfait…

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, Food porn, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

The rise of the Flexitarians

Pescatarians, vegetarians, fruitarians – and finally a sensible diet, flexitarian. What is this? “Carnivores who are happy to eat only the best quality meat but those who feel equally happy with a plate of pure veg.”

Yip, that means no more meats plumped up with water and chemicals. Instead, pasture-reared pork/beef/chicken where the animal has lived a good life and the meat is so much better for it.

In its extreme, flexitarianists are vegetarians who occasionally indulge in meat.

It’s said that :’ This movement will be driven further by chefs at the top of chain intent on developing vegetable driven menus, chefs like Alexis Gauthier and his Vegetronic cuisine: non-vegetarian vegetable tasting menus with dishes such as carrots lovingly bathed in lamb juices. Could we see Vegetarians opting to take part in Meaty Fridays? One day of the week when bacon is allowed?”

Well, if you can only eat bacon one day of the week – then you had better make sure it’s the best, artisan bacon available, free of the nasties and full on the taste. Check out www.baconofthemonth.co.za

Take a look what blogger extraordinaire Matt Allison made with one of his many Bacon of the Month instalments, a delicious homemade quattro stagioni
matt alison pizza

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bacon of the Month Club, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Edible Cinema

In London or planning a trip? Then make sure to check out Edible Cinema where you ‘See the film, taste the film’.

We’re all well indoctrinated to the taste of salty popcorn followed by a slurp of soda at the movies—Edible Cinema has turned this usual fare on its head, by offering cinema buffs the ‘a unique way to experience a film through aroma, texture and taste’.

Edible-Cinema

Before the movie begins each participant is supplied with a tray of numbered mystery boxes containing a bite-sized tasting menu which are said to be tailored to specific moments in the film.

For example at a screening of the 1981 classic An American Werewolf in London, there is a scene where the werewolf is about to much on some hapless tramps—the accompaniment was a “tramp’s finger” made from cola-smoked quail, complete with charcoal nail.

See the line-up of screenings here: www.ediblecinema.co.uk

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, London, Travel, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Ghost Food

Imagine a world without chocolate? That’s just what artists, Miriam Simun and Miriam Songster, have done with their collaborative project, Ghost Food.

ghost food

According to Edible Geography: ‘From a street-parked GhostFood truck, Simun and Songster and their team of trained staff will be serving a menu of three items, each of which conjures up a future dining experience for a food whose supply is currently threatened by climate change. The three items on offer — cod, chocolate, and peanut butter — come from or are species that “may very well soon not be available to eat,” Simun explains. With the help of a wearable smell-dispensing device and an edible textural analogue, GhostFood truck customers will experience a simulation of a future phantom food.”

ghostfood

It’s said that the apparatus was inspired by insect physiology, as insects use their antennae to navigate the world through scent.

What food couldn’t you live without?

*Images from psssst.net

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Would you bunk up with a stranger?

Would you bunk up with a stranger?
You’ve heard of couch surfing right? Easynest, a new website, is taking this concept to a whole new level, where you can share a hotel suite with a stranger to save on costs.
How it works:
You’re going on a trip, alone, so you log onto the website, create a profile, and offer to split your hotel room down the middle. Purely platonic of course. Of course.
Then, someone looking for a place to crash, can check your profile, and make you an offer.
The big question is – would you ever do this?

You’ve heard of couch surfing right? Easynest, a new website, is taking this concept to a whole new level, where you can share a hotel suite with a stranger to save on costs.

easy nest

How it works:
You’re going on a trip, alone, so you log onto the website, create a profile, and offer to split your hotel room down the middle. Purely platonic of course. Of course.

Then, someone looking for a place to crash, can check your profile, and make you an offer. Is it a clever way for you to enjoy a more premium hotel experience, or a great way to make your holiday awkward?

The big question is – would you ever do this?

easynest

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Hotel, Travel, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Who’s the pest?

We spotted this insect-eresting menu depicted on a slideshow on Nowness.
“Moth mousse whipped with hazelnut milk, cricket broth with a side of grasshopper garum sauce and a liquorice-glazed ant stick reveal their unexpectedly delicious side in this still-life series by photographer Joss McKinley.’
a
Nowness reports that the Nordic Food Lab, created the ‘experimental menu as part of the Wellcome Collection’s Who’s the Pest? season, a collaboration with a mobile arts “Pestival” in celebration of all things six-legged’.
The Nordic Food Lab is run by René Redzepi of Noma, and sits in a houseboat across the harbour from his restaurant.
According to Nowness, it was ‘born out of Redzepi’s quest to tap into more local and underused ingredients, it is a forum in which chefs meet scientists, chemists and academics on a shared mission to explore the 1,400 untapped wholesome crawling creatures that are edible to man’.a

We spotted this insect-eresting menu depicted on a slideshow on Nowness.

pestival

“Moth mousse whipped with hazelnut milk, cricket broth with a side of grasshopper garum sauce and a liquorice-glazed ant stick reveal their unexpectedly delicious side in this still-life series by photographer Joss McKinley.’

Nowness reports that the Nordic Food Lab, created the ‘experimental menu as part of the Wellcome Collection’s Who’s the Pest? season, a collaboration with a mobile arts “Pestival” in celebration of all things six-legged’.

The Nordic Food Lab is run by René Redzepi of Noma, and sits in a houseboat across the harbour from his restaurant.

According to Nowness, it was ‘born out of Redzepi’s quest to tap into more local and underused ingredients, it is a forum in which chefs meet scientists, chemists and academics on a shared mission to explore the 1,400 untapped wholesome crawling creatures that are edible to man’.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

The next big trends in hotels

The Next Big Trends in Hotels
Condé Nast Traveller has gathered information of the hottest new trends in hotels from influential people in the business that will be setting the tone for interior design, food, architecture and wellness in 2014.
Francis Ford Coppola, hotelier and owner of the Palazzo Margherita in Bernalda, Basilicata, Italy gave insight into:
WHAT’S NEXT IN HOTELS
In with intimacy “Super-high-end travelers (especially those with families) are looking for luxury on a smaller scale now, almost akin to a yacht. When I was in South America, I noticed how some of the guests regarded with disdain all the suitcases and crowds of people who were checking in and out, and I realized how many travelers want more privacy and intimacy. It’s not good for a hotel to be too big. The highest level of the luxury market will even prefer a hotel small enough to be taken over by one or two families.”
Big-league bathrooms “One rule I have for my hotels is the bathrooms have to be better than what you have at home. There needs to be some practicality in design (like having enough space to keep products in the shower, for example, and not tripping over them on the floor). The next wave of bathrooms will be larger. In fact, many guests now want their own private bathrooms when traveling as a couple, so the next trend will be room configurations with two bathrooms for every room.”
While Andrew Tarlow, restaurateur and owner of Wythe Hotel’s Reynard in Brooklyn shared his thoughts on:
WHAT’S NEXT IN HOTEL FOOD
Community building “Hotels and their restaurants will become more seamless with the surrounding area. We’ll see less of a distinction between a hotel restaurant and a neighborhood hangout, with locals—not just hotel guests—spending time there. The hotel itself will become a community.”
Away with formality “We’ll continue to see hotel restaurants that are basically fine dining in terms of the quality of food and service but without the attributes we traditionally consider staples of ‘fine dining,’ like a sommelier, white tablecloths, multiple captains in the dining room, etc. All of this is becoming much less relevant, which is redefining what good service means. Our increasing desire to know where our food and wine come from is putting the focus on the quality and origin of the ingredients rather than on the formality of the room and service.”
For the rest of the trend predictions head on over to Condé Nast Traveller.

Condé Nast Traveller has gathered the hottest new trends in hotels that will be setting the tone for interior design, food, architecture and wellness in 2014 from influential people in the business

Francis Ford Coppola, hotelier and owner of the Palazzo Margherita in Bernalda, Basilicata, Italy gave insight into:

WHAT’S NEXT IN HOTELS
In with intimacy
“Super-high-end travelers (especially those with families) are looking for luxury on a smaller scale now, almost akin to a yacht. When I was in South America, I noticed how some of the guests regarded with disdain all the suitcases and crowds of people who were checking in and out, and I realized how many travelers want more privacy and intimacy. It’s not good for a hotel to be too big. The highest level of the luxury market will even prefer a hotel small enough to be taken over by one or two families.”

Big-league bathrooms “One rule I have for my hotels is the bathrooms have to be better than what you have at home. There needs to be some practicality in design (like having enough space to keep products in the shower, for example, and not tripping over them on the floor). The next wave of bathrooms will be larger. In fact, many guests now want their own private bathrooms when traveling as a couple, so the next trend will be room configurations with two bathrooms for every room.”

One of our many private and intimate suites

One of our many private and intimate suites

While Andrew Tarlow, restaurateur and owner of Wythe Hotel’s Reynard in Brooklyn shared his thoughts on:

WHAT’S NEXT IN HOTEL FOOD
Community building
“Hotels and their restaurants will become more seamless with the surrounding area. We’ll see less of a distinction between a hotel restaurant and a neighborhood hangout, with locals—not just hotel guests—spending time there. The hotel itself will become a community.”

Away with formality “We’ll continue to see hotel restaurants that are basically fine dining in terms of the quality of food and service but without the attributes we traditionally consider staples of ‘fine dining,’ like a sommelier, white tablecloths, multiple captains in the dining room, etc. All of this is becoming much less relevant, which is redefining what good service means. Our increasing desire to know where our food and wine come from is putting the focus on the quality and origin of the ingredients rather than on the formality of the room and service.”

We did away with our tablecloths a long time ago!

We did away with our tablecloths a long time ago!

For the rest of the trend predictions head on over to Condé Nast Traveller.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Hotel, Travel, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


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