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Recipe: 12-hour pulled Karoo lamb shoulder

Bread & Wine recently posted a photo on their Facebook page of sublime dish: 12-hour pulled Karoo lamb shoulder with buttered lentil sourdough, aubergine, shallot & mint…

Needless to say, it piqued some interest. And Head Chef, Neil Jewell was only too happy to share the recipe with us.

karoo lamb

Slow cooked lamb shoulder
Serves 8

Wine suggestion: Môreson Mata Mata

Brine
Water & molasses
Warm water add molasses and stir to dissolve
Chill in a non-reactive container
Add trimmed lamb shoulder and leave in brine overnight

Spice rub
15 ml coriander seed
15 ml cumin
15 ml dried garlic
15 ml dried onion flake
15 ml paprika
5 ml cayenne
15 ml black pepper corns
Grind together in a pestle & mortar.

Method
Remove the lamb from brine and incorporate the spice rub well all over the cut. Place the meat on the Big Green Egg and cook at 110 -120 C, till tender; or in the oven at the same temperature.

Leave overnight. Then pick meat from the bone; and reserve. Use the bones and skin to make a stock. Reduce to a light syrup.

Potato crisps
Budget on 1 potato for four people

Wash, peel and then slice very thinly using a mandolin, if possible. Keep the slices in a bowl of cold water for ten minutes. The, drain and lay on a baking tray, brush with clarified butter, cover with greaseproof paper and weigh down with salt/lentils. Bake at 125 C for 60 -90 minutes.

Parboil 1 kg baby potatoes till tender. Drain and fry in olive oil and butter till lightly coloured. Wash and dry 20 leaves of sorrel, then tear into strips. Place lamb, potato and sliced onion onto platter. Scatter with potato crisps

Garnish your platter with 150 ml rocket juice, aerated with a stick blender and 5 ml lecithin.

Or, stuff the unctuous lamb into a  lentil sourdough bun

Recipe
Lentil sourdough

600 gram white bread flour
100 gram rye flour
500 gram French sourdough starter
15 ml salt
40 gram fresh yeast
300 ml water
300 gram lentils, cooked & drained

Dissolve yeast in water, mix with starter. Combine flours, salt & lentils. Add the liquid and work on the dough hook at speed two, till elastic & sticky.Remove dough hook and allow dough to rest covered till doubled in size. Chafe and portion into 120 gram pieces, ball. Cover and prove again till doubled in size. Brush with olive oil. Bake at 200C for 5 minutes, reduce heat to 150C and bake through, 10 minutes.

Recipe: 12-hour pulled Karoo lamb shoulder
Bread & Wine recently posted a photo on their Facebook page of sublime dish: 12-hour pulled Karoo lamb shoulder with buttered lentil sourdough, aubergine, shallot & mint…
Needless to say, it piqued some interest. And Head Chef, Neil Jewell was only too happy to share the recipe with us.
Slow cooked lamb shoulder
Serves 8
Wine suggestion: Moreson Mata Mata
Brine
Water & molasses
Warm water add molasses and stir to dissolve
Chill in a non-reactive container
Add trimmed lamb shoulder and leave in brine overnight
Spice rub
15 ml coriander seed
15 ml cumin
15 ml dried garlic
15 ml dried onion flake
15 ml paprika
5 ml cayenne
15 ml black pepper corns
Grind together in a pestle & mortar.
Method
Remove the lamb from brine and incorporate the spice rub well all over the cut. Place the meat on the Big Green Egg and cook at 110 -120 C, till tender; or in the oven at the same temperature.
Leave overnight. Then pick meat from the bone; and reserve. Use the bones and skin to make a stock. Reduce to a light syrup.
Potato crisps
Budget on 1 potato for four people
Wash, peel and then slice very thinly using a mandolin, if possible. Keep the slices in a bowl of cold water for ten minutes. The, drain and lay on a baking tray, brush with clarified butter, cover with greaseproof paper and weigh down with salt/lentils. Bake at 125 C for 60 -90 minutes.
Parboil 1 kg baby potatoes till tender. Drain and fry in olive oil and butter till lightly coloured. Wash and dry 20 leaves of sorrel, then tear into strips. Place lamb, potato and sliced onion onto platter. Scatter with potato crisps
Garnish your platter with 150 ml rocket juice, aerated with a stick blender and 5 ml lecith
Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, Neil Jewell, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

A recipe for unbelievably delicious drumsticks

At our recent Blessing of the Harvest, Neil Jewell prepared a feast for kings – and appropriately his beautiful drumsticks were medieval hunks of deliciousness. We thought we just have to share his method of preparation with you. Enjoy!

Bread and Wine chicken drumsticks

First up, get the fattest, most free-range/bio-dynamic/organic chicken drumsticks possible.

Method:

Allow two drumsticks per person
Clean drumsticks, removing knuckle & trimming excess skin
Make brine, using 40 gram salt per 1 litre of water
Place drumsticks in brine and leave submerged for 24 hours
Remove from brine and rinse
Place in a vac bag and seal, then poach in sous vide at 65 C for 90 minutes.
Remove, ice bath to cool.
Make a spice crumb using panko crumbs and your choice of spices
Use egg wash & buttermilk and pane the drumsticks
Deep fry to order & enjoy

Allow two drumsticks per person
Clean drumsticks, removing knuckle & trimming excess skin
Make brine, using 40 gram salt per 1 litre of water
Place drumsticks in brine and leave submerged for 24 hours
Remove from brine and rinse
Place in a vac bag and seal, then poach in sous vide at 65 C for 90 minutes.
Remove, ice bath to cool.
Make a spice crumb using panko crumbs and your choice of spices
Use egg wash & buttermilk and pane the drumsticks
Deep fry to order & enjoy.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, Neil Jewell, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Make a Français ’75 this New Year’s Eve

Wow your guests this New Year’s Eve with our take on classic champagne cocktail the French ’75. We’ve made it our own by using gin infused with Lady Bonin’s Earl Grey Tea—and of course of family farm’s delightful MCC, Miss Molly from Moreson.
Here’s the recipe for you to make at home, or you can come join us for New Year’s Eve at our Lounge Bar and let us make it for you! We have a host of creative cocktails that will surely keep you entertained, view the list here. Not to mention all of our delicious Bar Bites.
Recipe for Français ’75
Lady Bonin’s Earl Grey Tea, Infused Dry Gin, Miss Molly Bubbly, Fresh Lemon, Sugar. Bright & Sparklingly Aromatic, Afternoon Tea at its Best
To start, make the infused gin by adding four teaspoons of Lady Bonin’s loose leaf Earl Grey  to a bottle of Beefeater Gin. We placed the gin in the freezer first and brought it down to -20*c. This allows us great control of the amount of tannins we release from the tea. After about 10 days we remove from the freezer, strain and bottle. (We realise you don’t  have time for this with New Year’s around the corner, but do it today to allow maximum infusion in this short time frame.)
35ml Earl Grey Gin
15ml Fresh Lemon Juice
7.5ml Vanilla Sugar (2:1, sugar: water, slowly steeped with vanilla pods)
Topped with 100ml of Miss Molly MCC
Serve in a champagne flute and garnish with a lemon zest spiral. The drink is thrown from shaker to shaker before topping with MCC; this allows us control over dilution and to further aerate the drink, allowing for a sharper taste.

Wow your guests this New Year’s Eve with our take on classic champagne cocktail the French ’75. We’ve made it our own by using gin infused with Lady Bonin’s Earl Grey Tea—and of course our family farm’s delightful MCC, Miss Molly from Môreson.

Here’s the recipe for you to make at home, or you can come join us for New Year’s Eve at our Lounge Bar and let us make it for you! We have a host of creative cocktails that will surely keep you entertained, not to mention all of our delicious Bar Bites.

Recipe for Français ’75

Matt Roberts

Lady Bonin’s Earl Grey Tea, Infused Dry Gin, Miss Molly Bubbly, Fresh Lemon, Sugar. Bright & Sparklingly Aromatic, Afternoon Tea at its Best

To start, make the infused gin by adding four teaspoons of Lady Bonin’s loose leaf Earl Grey  to a bottle of Beefeater Gin. We placed the gin in the freezer first and brought it down to -20*c. This allows us great control of the amount of tannins we release from the tea. After about 10 days we remove from the freezer, strain and bottle. We realise you don’t  have time for this with New Year’s around the corner, but you can infuse the tea at room temperature which will take about 5 minutes to get the flavour – by freezing though you get a much fresher flavour and satisfying tannic dryness.

35ml Earl Grey Gin
15ml Fresh Lemon Juice
7.5ml Vanilla Sugar (2:1, sugar: water, slowly steeped with vanilla pods)
Topped with 100ml of Miss Molly MCC

Serve in a champagne flute and garnish with a lemon zest spiral. The drink is thrown from shaker to shaker before topping with MCC; this allows us control over dilution and to further aerate the drink, allowing for a sharper taste.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Le Quartier Français, Le Quartier Lounge Bar, Môreson, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 1


  

Bread & Wine featured in Country Life Magazine

Stuck for inspiration on what to cook for Christmas lunch? Then grab the December issue of Country Life Magazine. Neil and Tina Jewell of Bread & Wine share simple yet exciting recipes for ‘a long laid-back lunch’.  Think, smoked trout served on a plank with salsa verde, two-way carrot salad with buttered prawns, slow-cooked lamb shoulder and more.

country life

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, Neil Jewell, Press, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Pork crackling by Neil Jewell

Not much can beat that snap of perfectly made crackling: salty, savoury and moreish, it’s a pig lover’s delight. Eat on its own as a snack, crumble over risotto or pair with moist roast pork.
Ingredients
300gram pork skin (tip: make friends with a good butcher and you’ll get this for cheap, cheap)
7.5 ml pimento
1 star anise
2.5ml nutmeg
2.5 ml cracked black pepper
2.5 ml paprika
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
10ml coarse sea salt
Method
Dry roast spices and grind to a powder. Rub spice and salt into skin. Place in a bag and leave overnight in the fridge. Cook in a low oven, 160 °C on a cooling rack, for 2 ½ hours.

Not much can beat that snap of perfectly made crackling: salty, savoury and moreish, it’s a pig lover’s delight. Eat on its own as a snack, crumble over risotto or pair with moist roast pork.

crackling pork

Delicious roast pork lunch at Bread & Wine

Ingredients
300gr pork skin (tip: make friends with a good butcher and you’ll get this for cheap, cheap)
7.5 ml pimento
1 star anise
2.5ml nutmeg
2.5 ml cracked black pepper
2.5 ml paprika
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
10ml coarse sea salt

Method
Dry roast spices and grind to a powder. Rub spice and salt into skin. Place in a bag and leave overnight in the fridge. Cook in a low oven, 160 °C on a cooling rack, for 2 ½ hours.

Chop and eat!

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, Chefs, Neil Jewell, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Feta, green garlic oil and kitchen dried tomato focaccia

Singing with olive and herbs, focaccia has a culinary history dating back 2000 years. The name is purported to mean hearth or fireside and through the centuries this staple Italy bread has been eaten straight off the coals, warm and crusty, a peasant’s and nobleman’s feast alike.
hearth or fireside so its easy to see what role it had in everyday life throughout the centuries.hearth or fireside so its easy to see what role it had in everyday life throughout the centuries.
Enjoy this recipe for feta, green garlic oil and kitchen dried tomato focaccia from the kitchen of Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant.

Singing with olive and herbs, focaccia has a culinary history dating back 2000 years. The name is purported to mean hearth or fireside and through the centuries this staple Italy bread has been eaten straight off the coals, warm and crusty, a peasant’s and nobleman’s feast alike.

focaccia

Enjoy this recipe for feta, green garlic oil and kitchen dried tomato focaccia from the kitchen of Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant.

Ingredients
600gr white bread flour
25gr fresh yeast
15ml salt
400ml water
45 ml Olive oil, plus extra

Focaccia

Method
Cream the yeast with 300ml water, add 45ml olive oil. Combine the flour and salt in a bowl, make a well in the centre and pour the yeasted liquid into the well. Draw the flour in, adding the remaining water as needed to make a soft, sticky dough.Knead for 15 minutes to form smooth pliable dough.

Leave to rise for 30 minutes.

For herb focaccia:

Deflate the dough and divide in half, shape each piece into a round and flatten slightly. Top with herbs of your choice – rosemary, lemon thyme and sage work well.

Preheat the oven to 200C. Leave to prove for 30 to 40 minutes. Poke the bread with fingers, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Bake for approximately 20 – 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

For filled focaccia:
Deflate the dough and divide in half, shape each piece into a rectangle. Spread the surface with green garlic oil, fill the centre third of the dough with feta and kitchen dried tomatoes. Fold to close like a book, covering the feta and tomatoes with dough, sealing at the ends. Preheat the oven to 200C. Leave to prove for 30 to 40 minutes. Poke the bread with fingers, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Bake for approximately 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

300 gram Feta
Green garlic oil
Olive oil
4 peeled garlic cloves
100gr rocket or basil

For the green garlic oil:
Wash the rocket or basil and dry. Then blend together with the garlic and enough olive oil in a food processor, to form a smooth paste.

For the kitchen dried tomatoes:
The day before make your kitchen dried tomatoes, using 4 tomatoes. Cut the tomato into quarters and place on a baking tray. Sprinkle with a small amount of sea salt and dried herbs (thyme or herb de Provance) Leave to dry out in the warming drawer of an oven or an oven that has not been on in the last hour. Allow drying for 24 – 36 hours.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, recipe, recipes,
comment-notesComments:


  

Beetroot bread recipe

“The beet is the most intense of vegetables. The radish, admittedly, is more feverish, but the fire of the radish is a cold fire, the fire of discontent not of passion. Tomatoes are lusty enough, yet there runs through tomatoes an undercurrent of frivolity. Beets are deadly serious.” – Tom Robbins

beetroot

Channel the most ‘intense of all the vegetables’ into this easy Beetroot Bread recipe courtesy of Tina Jewell from Bread & Wine.

Beetroot bread

beetroot bread

Ingredients:

* 1.4kg white bread flour
* 70g yeast
* 3tsp fine salt
* 1litre beetroot juice (from raw beetroot through juicer)
* 2tbsp fermented beets
* 50g beetroot leaves – sauté in a hot pan with salt & pepper & butter

Fermented beets
Grate 1000gr of fresh beetroot, add 20gr salt, mix together in a large enough bag. Squeeze bag top and close using string to tie. Leave to ferment in a warm space for about 7 -10 days. Ready to use.

Method
• .combine flour with salt
• Mix beetroot juice with yeast, dissolve together
• Add yeasty beet juice to flour, start to mix in. Add the sautéed beet leaves and fermented beet
• Work on a dough hook until it starts to come together as a ball, shiny & soft
• Cover and prove for 1 hour
• Deflate and divide into 6 even sized balls, shape as desired.
• Prove again till doubled in size
• Bake at 200 C for first 10 minutes bringing temperature down to 180 C for the next 30 mins and 150C while finishing off baking.

Looking for more cooking adventure? Try this recipe for Margot Janse’s beetroot sponge with buttermilk labne.

Beetroot recipe

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

West coast oysters with lardo, potato crackling and onion

West coast oysters with lardo, potato crackling and onion
Onion Foam
Ingredients –
4 onions, finely chopped
Sprig of thyme
Bay leaf
1 clove garlic, crushed
125 ml chicken stock
500ml milk
2.5ml lemon juice
Method
Sauté the onions, till lightly coloured
Add thyme, bay leaf and garlic
Add chicken stock and milk and bring to the boil
Strain the stock and grate in 1 raw onion
Add lemon juice and season to taste
West coast oysters – cleaned and shucked
Lardo, grated –
Cook over a gentle heat till crispy, drain on tissue paper
1 potato, grated
Sauté over a gentle heat till crispy, drain on tissue paper
Fresh chervil
To serve
Place a sprinkling over lardo and potato on top of loosened oyster and a chervil leaf
Blitz some of the onion stock to make a foam (use some lecithin)
Spoon a generous teaspoon over each oyster

Oyster: bright, briny and beautiful. To be eaten raw, fresh with sea life, to savour the ‘merroir’ of their harvest bed. West Coast oysters are sublime, sweet and plump, with powerful seaweed umami flavour.

Bread and Wine oyster

“As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.” ― Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Bread & Wine has shared this recipe for West Coast oysters with lardo, potato crackling and onion

oyster

Onion Foam
4 onions, finely chopped
Sprig of thyme
Bay leaf
1 clove garlic, crushed
125 ml chicken stock
500ml milk
2.5ml lemon juice

Method
Sauté the onions, till lightly coloured. Add thyme, bay leaf and garlic. Add chicken stock and milk and bring to the boil. Strain the stock and grate in 1 raw onion. Add lemon juice and season to taste.

- West coast oysters – cleaned and shucked
- Lardo, grated – Cook over a gentle heat till crispy, drain on tissue paper
- 1 potato, grated – Sauté over a gentle heat till crispy, drain on tissue paper
- Fresh chervil

To serve
Place a sprinkling over lardo and potato on top of loosened oyster and a chervil leaf. Blitz some of the onion stock to make a foam (use some lecithin). Spoon a generous teaspoon over each oyster.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Champagne cocktails with candied edible flowers

For a Christmas cocktail with a difference pop a candied edible flower into a flute and top up with Champagne. The bubbles will stream prettily around the petals, and it makes a nice change from a cherry or a strawberry.

To make the candies it couldn’t be simpler. Either purchase edible flowers – plenty of stores have them these days – or pick your own, just make sure they haven’t been sprayed with pesticide. Try rose petals (good for the Christmasy look), snapdragons, honeysuckle or pansies, simply dunk your choice of flora into a cooled sugar syrup and leave to dry on wax paper.

Top up your glass with one of our favourite Franschhoek or French bubblies.

If you’d rather not go through the effort (you do after all have a turkey/duck/chicken/cow to roast), grab a jar of Wild Hibiscus: pre-made edible hibiscus flowers in syrup.

Hibiscus in champagne

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Cocktails, Franschhoek, French Champagnes, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Mushrooms on a stick for Braai Day

An easy idea for Braai Day. Simply coat a selection of mushrooms in olive oil, garlic and fresh herbs then thread on a stick or skewer for a gorgeous and delicious side.

braai mushrooms

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Ingredients, Inspiration, recipes,
comment-notesComments: 0


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