Archive for the ‘recipe’ Category

How to make the perfect cup of tea

Thursday, June 26th, 2014
These winter days call for countless cups of tea—and like any culinary art, it’s only worth doing if you’re doing it well. See the steps below for the perfect cup of tea,
Oxygen. Tea, like the rest of us, needs oxygen to be at its best. Always fill the kettle with fresh cold water drawn from the tap. And chuck the stagnated water sitting in the kettle out.
The tea itself. You’ll only get out what you put in. Choose a high quality loose leaf tea. Not the powdery dregs found in low quality tea bags (there are of course good quality tea bags too).
Put it in a pot. Let the tea steep and draw in a warmed China pot. Not only will it taste better, but it will brighten up your desk or table too. So nice to be civilised dahling.
Let the tea steep for no shorter than 3 minutes—then take the bag out, immediately.
Kick low fat milk to the curb (it’s just coloured water, gross)—and never, ever put the milk in first.
Only 1 teaspoon of sugar allowed.
Enjoy!

These winter days call for countless cups of tea—and like anything in life, it’s only worth doing if you’re doing it well. See the steps below for the perfect cup of tea.

how to make the perfect cup of tea

Oxygen. Tea, like the rest of us, needs oxygen to be at its best. Always fill the kettle with fresh cold water drawn from the tap. And chuck the stagnated water sitting in the kettle out.

The tea itself. You’ll only get out what you put in. Choose a high quality loose leaf tea. Not the powdery dregs found in low quality tea bags (there are of course good quality tea bags too).

Put it in a pot. Let the tea steep and draw in a warmed China pot. Not only will it taste better, but it will brighten up your desk or table too. So nice to be civilised dahling.

Let the tea steep for no shorter than 3 minutes—then take the bag out, immediately.

Kick low fat milk to the curb (it’s just coloured water, gross)—and never, ever put the milk in first.

Only 1 teaspoon of sugar allowed.

Enjoy!

Recipe: Egg Custard Tart

Friday, May 9th, 2014

Want to make mom smile this Mother’s Day? Well of course you do. The folks at Bread & Wine have decided to help you in the smile department with this easy-to-make yet delicious dessert, with free range eggs supplied by good friend Farmer Angus.

Egg Custard Dessert

Sweet pastry

Ingredients
500 gram cake flour
250 gram butter
150 gram castor sugar
2 eggs

Method
Crumb butter, flour & sugar together, add eggs and mix till smooth. Cover in cling film and rest dough in fridge overnight. Roll out and line a 20cm tart ring, leaving a flap over the edge; rest for 20 minutes in the fridge. Then blind bake in a preheated oven at 150 C till golden brown, remove the beans and continue cooking till base is cooked. Remove from oven lightly egg wash base and return to oven for a few minutes to set.

Egg custard

Ingredients
10 egg yolks
450 ml double cream
100 gram castor sugar

Method
In a bowl combine egg yolks & sugar and mix till smooth with a whisk. Bring the cream to the boil, pour over egg & sugar mixture, mix well. Pass through a sieve and skim any foam from the top. Fill the prepared pastry case and cook at 100 C till custard is set with a slight wobble, approximately 30 minutes.

While still hot dust with ground nutmeg. Cool to room temperature before trimming the extra pastry edge and serving.

Serve with vanilla ice cream and poached fruit.

Bacon, lettuce and tomato pizza by Neil Jewell

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

You lucky things! Neil Jewell has agreed to share his recipe for his utterly delectable BLT pizza – bacon purée included! Of course, you’ll need the best bacon in the universe to make it – don’t worry, it’s easy to get, here you go: www.baconofthemonth.co.za

Bacon, lettuce and tomato pizza
Pizza dough
500 gram white bread flour
5 gram salt
5 gram fresh yeast
Water as needed
Olive oil
Method
Dissolve the yeast in 125ml water; add a generous splash of olive oil. Then combine the salt & flour in a large bowl. Add the yeast, mixing well to form a soft and slightly sticky dough.
Turn onto table and work well till the dough starts to pull away from table, stretching, twisting and turning.
Cover with cling film and allow to rest for 30-60 minutes. Once this time period is up portion into 120 gram balls. You can leave the balls to rest in the fridge till needed, or roll out to desired size.
Bacon purée
300 gram bacon off-cuts
300 gram mirepoix (leek, celery, onion, garlic & carrot)
Method
Cook the bacon, allowing to colour slightly, add the mirepiox and continue cooking allowing to colour. Cook down over a low heat, for about 60 minutes.
Remove from heat, cool slightly then puree in blender adding a small amount of iced water to emulsify.
Dill-pickled tomatoes
1.2 kg water
1 kg peeled baby tomatoes
100 gram untreated salt
Large handful fresh dill
2 cloves fresh garlic
Method
Bring the water and salt to the boil, dissolving the salt. Add the dill and garlic. Pour over the peeled baby tomatoes, cover bowl and allow to cool.
Semi-dried tomatoes
Remove the skins from the tomatoes. Allow to dry overnight in a low oven
To assemble
Heat your oven to 200 ºC. Then roll out your pizza base, to desired size, par bake in the oven for 3 to 5 minutes. While this is happening, pre-cook half a packet of the best quality streaky bacon in a pan, till just slightly coloured.
Remove the base from the oven and smear with the bacon purée. Then top with a mixture of the prepared tomatoes, torn buffalo mozzarella, and streaky bacon, and return to oven to bake for further 4-6 minutes.
Once sizzling and bubbly, take the pizza out of the oven and top with shredded cos lettuce leaves tossed in a mustard dressing.

Bacon, lettuce and tomato pizza

BLT pizza

Pizza dough
500 gram white bread flour
5 gram salt
5 gram fresh yeast
Water as needed
Olive oil

Method
Dissolve the yeast in 125ml water; add a generous splash of olive oil. Then combine the salt & flour in a large bowl. Add the yeast, mixing well to form a soft and slightly sticky dough.

Turn onto table and work well till the dough starts to pull away from table, stretching, twisting and turning.

Cover with cling film and allow to rest for 30-60 minutes. Once this time period is up portion into 120 gram balls. You can leave the balls to rest in the fridge till needed, or roll out to desired size.

Bacon purée
300 gram bacon off-cuts
300 gram mirepoix (leek, celery, onion, garlic & carrot)

Method
Cook the bacon, allowing to colour slightly, add the mirepiox and continue cooking allowing to colour. Cook down over a low heat, for about 60 minutes.

Remove from heat, cool slightly then puree in blender adding a small amount of iced water to emulsify.

Dill-pickled tomatoes
1.2 kg water
1 kg peeled baby tomatoes
100 gram untreated salt
Large handful fresh dill
2 cloves fresh garlic

Method
Bring the water and salt to the boil, dissolving the salt. Add the dill and garlic. Pour over the peeled baby tomatoes, cover bowl and allow to cool.

Semi-dried tomatoes
Remove the skins from the tomatoes. Allow to dry overnight in a low oven.

To assemble
Heat your oven to 200 ºC. Then roll out your pizza base, to desired size, par bake in the oven for 3 to 5 minutes. While this is happening, pre-cook half a packet of the best quality streaky bacon in a pan, till just slightly coloured.

Remove the base from the oven and smear with the bacon purée. Then top with a mixture of the prepared tomatoes, torn buffalo mozzarella, and streaky bacon, and return to oven to bake for further 4-6 minutes.

Once sizzling and bubbly, take the pizza out of the oven and top with shredded cos lettuce leaves tossed in a mustard dressing.

Feta, green garlic oil and kitchen dried tomato focaccia

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

Singing with olive and herbs, focaccia has a culinary history dating back 2000 years. The name is purported to mean hearth or fireside and through the centuries this staple Italy bread has been eaten straight off the coals, warm and crusty, a peasant’s and nobleman’s feast alike.
hearth or fireside so its easy to see what role it had in everyday life throughout the centuries.hearth or fireside so its easy to see what role it had in everyday life throughout the centuries.
Enjoy this recipe for feta, green garlic oil and kitchen dried tomato focaccia from the kitchen of Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant.

Singing with olive and herbs, focaccia has a culinary history dating back 2000 years. The name is purported to mean hearth or fireside and through the centuries this staple Italy bread has been eaten straight off the coals, warm and crusty, a peasant’s and nobleman’s feast alike.

focaccia

Enjoy this recipe for feta, green garlic oil and kitchen dried tomato focaccia from the kitchen of Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant.

Ingredients
600gr white bread flour
25gr fresh yeast
15ml salt
400ml water
45 ml Olive oil, plus extra

Focaccia

Method
Cream the yeast with 300ml water, add 45ml olive oil. Combine the flour and salt in a bowl, make a well in the centre and pour the yeasted liquid into the well. Draw the flour in, adding the remaining water as needed to make a soft, sticky dough.Knead for 15 minutes to form smooth pliable dough.

Leave to rise for 30 minutes.

For herb focaccia:

Deflate the dough and divide in half, shape each piece into a round and flatten slightly. Top with herbs of your choice – rosemary, lemon thyme and sage work well.

Preheat the oven to 200C. Leave to prove for 30 to 40 minutes. Poke the bread with fingers, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Bake for approximately 20 – 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

For filled focaccia:
Deflate the dough and divide in half, shape each piece into a rectangle. Spread the surface with green garlic oil, fill the centre third of the dough with feta and kitchen dried tomatoes. Fold to close like a book, covering the feta and tomatoes with dough, sealing at the ends. Preheat the oven to 200C. Leave to prove for 30 to 40 minutes. Poke the bread with fingers, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Bake for approximately 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

300 gram Feta
Green garlic oil
Olive oil
4 peeled garlic cloves
100gr rocket or basil

For the green garlic oil:
Wash the rocket or basil and dry. Then blend together with the garlic and enough olive oil in a food processor, to form a smooth paste.

For the kitchen dried tomatoes:
The day before make your kitchen dried tomatoes, using 4 tomatoes. Cut the tomato into quarters and place on a baking tray. Sprinkle with a small amount of sea salt and dried herbs (thyme or herb de Provance) Leave to dry out in the warming drawer of an oven or an oven that has not been on in the last hour. Allow drying for 24 – 36 hours.

Lamb curry for cold nights

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013
This dish will keep you warm on cold winter nights. Vanie Padayachee, our Spice Guru, has shared a recipe for lamb curry, one of the many dishes she teaches in cooking class Cooking with Spices [http://www.lqf.co.za/cooking-classes/cooking-with-spices.htm]
Recipe
Lamb curry
1kg Boneless lamb – cut into pieces
50ml                    Plain yogurt
1tbsp                    Finely grated ginger
1tbsp                    Garlic – crushed
8                          Curry leaves – optional
2 tbsp                   Curry powder
1 tsp                     Turmeric powder
Place lamb pieces, plain yoghurt, ginger, garlic, curry leaves, curry powder and turmeric into a large bowl and mix well, cover and set aside
50gr                     Butter
75ml                    Oil
½tsp                    Cumin seeds
½tsp                    Coriander seeds
½tsp                    Black mustard seeds
Heat a heavy bottom pot; add in the oil and butter
Temper the spices – cumin, coriander and black mustard seeds (a popping sound)
2                          Onions – thinly sliced
2                          Chilies – thinly sliced
3                          Tomatoes – cut into small dice
Salt
2                          Potatoes – small dice
5gr                      Fresh coriander – roughly chopped
5gr                      Fresh mint – roughly chopped
1tsp                     Garma masala
Add in the onions and chilies
Sauté till onions are light brown
Add in tomatoes and sauté for a few minutes +- 3 minutes
Add in the marinated lamb pieces, season to taste with salt and add in 1 cup water, mix well
Cover with a lid and reduce heat
Add in potatoes and cook for 40 minutes, stirring occasionally
When lamb and potatoes are cooked, sauce is thicken with the starch from the potatoes
Add in chopped coriander, mint and garam masala
Serve with rice or roti
Serves 6 pax

This dish will keep you warm on cold winter nights. Vanie Padayachee, our Spice Guru and chef, has shared a recipe for lamb curry, one of the many dishes she teaches in cooking class Cooking with Spices.

cooking with spices

Recipe

Lamb curry
Serves 6

1kg  Boneless lamb – cut into pieces
50ml Plain yoghurt
1tbsp Finely grated ginger
1tbsp Garlic – crushed
8 Curry leaves – optional
2 tbsp Curry powder
1 tsp Turmeric powder

Place lamb pieces, plain yoghurt, ginger, garlic, curry leaves, curry powder and turmeric into a large bowl and mix well, cover and set aside

50gr Butter
75ml Oil
½tsp Cumin seeds
½tsp Coriander seeds
½tsp Black mustard seeds

Heat a heavy bottom pot; add in the oil and butter. Temper the spices – cumin, coriander and black mustard seeds (a popping sound)

2 Onions – thinly sliced
2 Chilies – thinly sliced
3 Tomatoes – cut into small dice
Salt
2 Potatoes – small dice
5gr Fresh coriander – roughly chopped
5gr Fresh mint – roughly chopped
1tsp Garma masala

Add in the onions and chilies. Sauté till onions are light brown. Add in tomatoes and sauté for a few minutes +- 3 minutes. Add in the marinated lamb pieces, season to taste with salt and add in 1 cup water, mix well .Cover with a lid and reduce heat. Add in potatoes and cook for 40 minutes, stirring occasionally. When lamb and potatoes are cooked, sauce is thickened with the starch from the potatoes add in chopped coriander, mint and garam masala. Serve with rice or roti

The buzz at The Nordic Food Lab

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013
Bee beer, beeswax ice cream, honey crisps – the gourmet researchers at The Nordic Food Lab have had a hive mentality with their latest experiments.
Said Guillemette Barthouil: “With the exception of honey, bee products are mainly considered medicinal. We eat them not because they are good but because they are good for us. Yet the bee hive produces a wide palette of fascinating flavours, which is rather incredible considering they all come from the same small house and are produced by the same animal.”
And, so the culinary academic spent a few weeks researching the different components in order to make a dessert based solely on ‘the beehive’.
And you can make it too! Head over to their blog for the recipes.  Now all you need is a beehive.
Who are they?
Nordic Food Lab is a non-profit, self-governed organisation, established in 2008 by head chef of Noma Rene Redzepi and gastronomic entrepreneur Claus Meyer. Our purpose is to explore the building blocks of Nordic cuisine through traditional and modern gastronomies, and to share these results with chefs, academics, industry, and the public. From a houseboat in Copenhagen harbour, we investigate old and new raw materials and techniques, developing knowledge and ideas for the Nordic region and the world.

Bee beer, beeswax ice cream, honey crisps – the gourmet researchers at The Nordic Food Lab have had a hive mentality with their latest experiments.

bee

Said Guillemette Barthouil: “With the exception of honey, bee products are mainly considered medicinal. We eat them not because they are good but because they are good for us. Yet the bee hive produces a wide palette of fascinating flavours, which is rather incredible considering they all come from the same small house and are produced by the same animal.”

And, so the culinary academic spent a few weeks researching the different components in order to make a dessert based solely on ‘the beehive’.

bee plate

And you can make it too! Head over to their blog for the recipes.  Now all you need is a beehive.

Who are they?
Nordic Food Lab is a non-profit, self-governed organisation, established in 2008 by head chef of Noma Rene Redzepi and gastronomic entrepreneur Claus Meyer. Our purpose is to explore the building blocks of Nordic cuisine through traditional and modern gastronomies, and to share these results with chefs, academics, industry, and the public. From a houseboat in Copenhagen harbour, we investigate old and new raw materials and techniques, developing knowledge and ideas for the Nordic region and the world.

Cheese Fondue Day & Recipe

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Americans love to celebrate their food culture, from ‘National Caramel Popcorn Day’ to ‘Animal Crackers Birthday’ (no jokes). Every single day in April has a foodie holiday, on the 11th of the month; they celebrate ‘National Cheese Fondue Day’, and since the days and nights are getting colder we thought we’d celebrate this one with them.

There’s hardly anything more comforting than a bowl of hot melted cheese, right!

cheese fondue

We scoured the web, and decided that this recipe from Food & Wine does the fondue justice. Chef Ryan Hardy makes shares a luxurious fondue that’s made with ‘two kinds of Swiss cheese (Emmentaler and Gruyère) and two kinds of spirits (white wine and Kirsch), all traditional ingredients.’

Pop into Bread & Wine for the dipping ingredients; crusts of beautiful sourdough bread and saucisson sec, then while you’re there grab a bottle of Môreson Dr Reason Why, it will cut through the richness of the dish and elevate the cheese.

Ingredients:
1 pound Gruyère cheese, coarsely shredded
1/2 pound Emmentaler cheese, coarsely shredded
1 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 garlic clove
1 cup dry white wine
1 tablespoon Kirsch
Salt and freshly ground white pepper
Crusty bread cubes, hard salami and small dill pickles, for serving

Method
In a bowl, toss the Gruyère and Emmentaler with the cornstarch. Rub the inside of a cheese fondue pot or medium, enameled cast-iron casserole with the garlic, then add the wine and bring to a simmer. Add the cheese mixture all at once. Using a wooden spoon, stir over moderately low heat just until the cheese is melted and smooth, about 5 minutes. Stir in the Kirsch and season with salt and pepper. Serve with the bread, salami and pickles.

Rump of lamb with fresh mint sauce for Easter

Thursday, March 28th, 2013
Servings: 8
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 8 hours 30 minutes
Ingredients
1 Knorr Lamb or Chicken Stock cube
1tbsp olive oil
1–2tsps finely chopped fresh thyme
8 thin lamb rump steaks
400g peas, either fresh, shelled peas or frozen, boiled until just tender, drained and cooled
1 shallot, finely chopped
Mint Sauce
150g caster sugar
150ml white wine vinegar
15g pack fresh mint
Marco’s note
I make my mint sauce in a particular way. I make a vinegar syrup and mix in blanched mint at the last minute. That’s because I want to maximise the flavour of the mint.
Method
1. First prepare the mint sauce. Place the sugar and vinegar in a small, non-corrosive pan, bring to the boil and cook until clear. Set aside and allow to cool.
2. Reserve 6 mint sprigs for the garnish. Pick the remaining mint leaves off the stalks, and blanch for ten seconds in a pan of boiling water, refresh at once in very cold water, squeeze out excess water and set aside until required.
3. Set two large, heavy griddle pans and pre-heat until very hot. When I say very hot, I mean it!
4. Make a seasoning paste by dissolving the Knorr Lamb/Chicken Stock Cube in the olive oil and mixing in the chopped thyme. Using a Knorr Stock Cube gives the meat extra depth of flavour.
5. Massage the seasoning paste evenly over both sides of the lamb steaks. Then place them on the pre-heated griddle pans.
6. Cook for one minute on one side, then turn and cook on the other side for one more minute (for a pink colour). Cook for 1½ minutes either side for medium cooked.
7. Meanwhile, finely chop the blanched mint leaves and mix into the vinegar syrup to make the mint sauce.
8. Place the cooked peas in a large serving dish and toss through ⅔ of the chopped shallot. Then place the freshly griddled lamb steaks on top of the peas. Spoon the mint sauce over.
9. Garnish with the reserved sprigs of fresh mint, top with a little more olive oil if desired, sprinkle over the remaining chopped shallot and serve at once. Really, nothing could be simpler.

We love this indulgent lamb recipe by celebrated chef Marco Pierre White; it’s the perfect dish to tuck into over Easter weekend.

Rump of lamb with fresh mint sauce
lamb

Servings: 8
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 8 hours 30 minutes

Ingredients
1 Knorr Lamb or Chicken Stock cube
1tbsp olive oil
1–2tsps finely chopped fresh thyme
8 thin lamb rump steaks
400g peas, either fresh, shelled peas or frozen, boiled until just tender, drained and cooled
1 shallot, finely chopped

Mint Sauce
150g caster sugar
150ml white wine vinegar
15g pack fresh mint

Marco’s note
I make my mint sauce in a particular way. I make a vinegar syrup and mix in blanched mint at the last minute. That’s because I want to maximise the flavour of the mint.

Method
1. First prepare the mint sauce. Place the sugar and vinegar in a small, non-corrosive pan, bring to the boil and cook until clear. Set aside and allow to cool.

2. Reserve 6 mint sprigs for the garnish. Pick the remaining mint leaves off the stalks, and blanch for ten seconds in a pan of boiling water, refresh at once in very cold water, squeeze out excess water and set aside until required.

3. Set two large, heavy griddle pans and pre-heat until very hot. When I say very hot, I mean it!

4. Make a seasoning paste by dissolving the Knorr Lamb/Chicken Stock Cube in the olive oil and mixing in the chopped thyme. Using a Knorr Stock Cube gives the meat extra depth of flavour.

5. Massage the seasoning paste evenly over both sides of the lamb steaks. Then place them on the pre-heated griddle pans.

6. Cook for one minute on one side, then turn and cook on the other side for one more minute (for a pink colour). Cook for 1½ minutes either side for medium cooked.

7. Meanwhile, finely chop the blanched mint leaves and mix into the vinegar syrup to make the mint sauce.

8. Place the cooked peas in a large serving dish and toss through ⅔ of the chopped shallot. Then place the freshly griddled lamb steaks on top of the peas. Spoon the mint sauce over.

9. Garnish with the reserved sprigs of fresh mint, top with a little more olive oil if desired, sprinkle over the remaining chopped shallot and serve at once. Really, nothing could be simpler.

Recipe source: www.hellomagazine.com

Margot Janse in Food & Home magazine

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Margot Janse is featured in the April edition of Food & Home at her country home in Franschhoek. The article jumps into her home life, which is punctuated by laughter, champagne, and family.

food and home magazine

The article includes recipes for:
Sticky ‘Farmer Angus’ beef short-ribs
Pickled cucumber and runner beans
Duncan’s Famous Pear Tarte Tatin
Egg yolk ravioli with mushroom ragout
Oysters with sour fig

food and home feature margot janse
Pickled cucumber and runner beans

The Common Room’s Strawberry Daiquiri

Friday, December 7th, 2012

Summer is most definitely here, and what better way to drink in than with an icy strawberry daiquiri? Here’s our recipe for our popular strawberry daiquiri from The Common Room. Cheers!

Ingredients:
50ml Bacardi
50ml Grenadine
25ml Triple Sec
50ml lime cordial
100g frozen strawberries

Method:
Put all ingredients in a blender with a scoop of ice and blend until slushly.

To serve:
Pour into daiquiri glass with sugared rim, and serve with a straw

daquiri