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What’s the next cupcake?

According to a Google trend report, the cupcake is the next cupcake. Confused? Everyone’s favourite mini cake has been the hottest dessert trend for the last decade; and trend forecasters have been waiting for the next big thing, and surprisingly, cupcakes are still top of the cake pops.
We think our sticky buns could take on the almighty cupcake, don’t you?

According to a Google trend report, the cupcake is the next cupcake.

cupcake

Confused? Everyone’s favourite mini cake has been the hottest dessert trend for the last decade; and forecasters have been waiting for the next big thing, and surprisingly, cupcakes are still top of the cake pops.

We think our sticky buns could take on the almighty cupcake, don’t you?

sticky bun

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Vii Chen – fruit and vegetable peel inspired tableware

We discovered the work of Taiwanese designer Vii Chen and loved the look of it. And the meaning behind the concept is even more to love.

“…tangible and intangible explanations between tactility are explored through production techniques in natural materials. ’peels’, includes a series of six geometric patterned ceramic cups that retain certain memories of a palpable interactions with certain fruits and vegetable skins. Literature reviews inform the idea of ‘ceremonial and memorial touch’ to generate a symbiotic emotion between users…”

vi chen

tangible and intangible
explanations between tactility are explored through production techniques in natural materials. ’peels’, includes a series
of six geometric patterned ceramic cups that retain certain memories of a palpable interactions with certain fruits and
vegetable skins. literature reviews inform the idea of ‘ceremonial and memorial touch’ to generate a symbiotic emotion
between use
Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Art, Food, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Henry Hargreaves

We just had to share some of the work of this talented food photographer. The model turned photographer grew up in Christchurch, New Zealand and has a unique way of looking at the world of food. Among his many projects he’s depicted countries and continents using iconic regional foods and photographed the last meal prisoners on death row.

27331_HenryHargreaves00

We swiped to questions from his website that explain his process, head over there to see more of his stuff.

You seem to be “affected” by the cardinal sin of childhood: playing with food. Why do you have developed such a mouth watering artistic obsession?
I always worked in the food industry before being able to be a full time photographer. I was fascinated about peoples requests and what they ordered said about their character and personality. I try to bring this idea into my work by showing the connections visually.

Say something about your process, how do you go about creating your work?
It’s very simple, I create visuals that appeal to me. Ideas can come from anyplace and usually if it makes me laugh or keeps coming back to my mind without writing it down I feel I should try to make it. Once I decide to execute something the only hurdle is my own motivation.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Food porn,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

What is Wagyu Beef?

At Bread & Wine, Neil Jewell has been tinkering with luxury meat product Wagyu Beef. On the menu find Wagyu bresoala with amaranth, pickled turnip and horseradish cream and a Wagyu burger served with suet mayonnaise & Klein Rivier parfait.
But what is Wagyu Beef? Neil sources his Wagyu beef from the Freestate. “These days the beef we eat comes from a cow no more than 8 months old, due to farming methods they don’t live much longer,” explains Neil. The Wagyu beef comes from a three-year-old cow and the difference is incredible. It’s beautifully marbled, and it actually tastes like beef!”
Wagyu has been the victim of myth and misconception.  Heralding from Japan, it was said that the cows producing the richly marbled meat were massaged daily while listening to classical music, and then fed beer. There is some truth in the beer – according to Fine Dining Lover it’s more ‘fermented wheat, a by-product from the beer factory’ than say your average Heineken.
Wagyu is the breed of cow, and this aligned with a strategic diet and good farming practices allows for the great quality of beef we can now enjoy on the South African plate.

At Bread & Wine, Neil Jewell has been tinkering with luxury meat product Wagyu Beef. On the menu you’ll find Wagyu bresoala with amaranth, pickled turnip and horseradish cream as well as a Wagyu burger served with suet mayonnaise & Klein Rivier parfait (ask about the delicious Wagyu biltong too).

waygu

But what is Wagyu beef? Neil sources his Wagyu beef from the Freestate. “These days commercial beef comes from a cow no more than 8 months old, due to farming methods they don’t live much longer,” explains Neil. The Wagyu beef comes from a three-year-old cow and the difference is incredible. It’s beautifully marbled, and it actually tastes like beef!”

Wagyu has been the victim of myth and misconception.  Heralding from Japan, it was said that the cows producing the richly marbled meat were massaged daily while listening to classical music, and then fed beer. There is some truth in the beer – according to Fine Dining Lover it’s more ‘fermented wheat, a by-product from the beer factory’ than say your average Heineken.

Simply put: Wagyu is the breed of cow, and this aligned with a strategic diet and good farming practices allows for the great quality of beef we can now enjoy on the South African plate.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, Food, Ingredients,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Edible Cinema

In London or planning a trip? Then make sure to check out Edible Cinema where you ‘See the film, taste the film’.

We’re all well indoctrinated to the taste of salty popcorn followed by a slurp of soda at the movies—Edible Cinema has turned this usual fare on its head, by offering cinema buffs the ‘a unique way to experience a film through aroma, texture and taste’.

Edible-Cinema

Before the movie begins each participant is supplied with a tray of numbered mystery boxes containing a bite-sized tasting menu which are said to be tailored to specific moments in the film.

For example at a screening of the 1981 classic An American Werewolf in London, there is a scene where the werewolf is about to much on some hapless tramps—the accompaniment was a “tramp’s finger” made from cola-smoked quail, complete with charcoal nail.

See the line-up of screenings here: www.ediblecinema.co.uk

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, London, Travel, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Big Appetites

Tiny people in a world of big food. We love this surreal take on the world of food photography.  Big Appetites is a series of fine art photographs by Christopher Boffoli that have been exhibited all over the globe; as well as a coffee table book by the same name.
“The series presents tiny, meticulously detailed figures posed in real food environments, referencing both a cultural fascination with tiny things as well as an American enthusiasm for excess, especially in the realm of food.”
Playful yet political, the works are visual parables that warn against excess and mindless consumption of the American diet.

Tiny people in a world of big food. We love this surreal take on the world of food photography.  Big Appetites is a series of fine art photographs by Christopher Boffoli that have been exhibited all over the globe; as well as a coffee table book by the same name.

big appetites

“The series presents tiny, meticulously detailed figures posed in real food environments, referencing both a cultural fascination with tiny things as well as an American enthusiasm for excess, especially in the realm of food.”

Playful yet political, the works are visual parables that warn against excess and mindless consumption of the American diet.

Condiment cleaners

Condiment cleaners

Pasta carwash

Pasta car wash

Caramel salt workers

Caramel salt workers

Peppercorn soccer

Peppercorn soccer

Rock candy ice fall

Rock candy ice fall

The book will be released in September 2013, and if you’re lucky enough to be in New York,  Boffoli’s series is also on display at the Winston Wächter Fine Art gallery through July 31, 2013

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Art, Food, Inspiration,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Forage & feast!

Blogger http://lanaloustyle.com captured the second edition of Linteloo at Weylandts in Joburg beautifully. We reported on the Cape Town event here. http://blog.lqf.co.za/2013/05/linteloo-at-weylandts/#more-999

Blogger lanaloustyle.com has captured Dutch design and food evening: Linteloo at Weylandts beautifully. We reported on the event here.  Thank you Lana for your beautiful words and photographs!

Weylandts-evening-1 (1)An excerpt: “We experienced a sensory and visual delight that’s certainly difficult to explain. Starting with a wooden tree adorned with bird houses and nests filled with intriguing colourful ‘balls’. You had no idea what you were biting into, which made the experience all the more fun. Potted salmon in squid ink crumbs, Beetroot and spiced lime in beetroot crumbs and Saffron risotto rolled in parmesan snow… the flavours were exceptional and so creative.” Read the rest of Lana’s piece here.

Weylandts-Dutch-Evening-6

Weylandts-Dutch-Evening-7 (1)Weylandts-Dutch-Evening-9 (1)

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Inspiration, Le Quartier Français, Margot Janse, events,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Linteloo at Weylandts

Linteloo
Last night at Weylandts in Green Point was like walking into The Secret Garden of gourmet food. Guests were giving foraging gloves at the door to protect their hands and clothes and instructed literally to dig in!
The night was a celebration of Dutch furniture designer Linteloo, who is also a benefactor of our charity Isabelo, where we feed 800 to 900 children a nutritional breakfast every day! Last night beautiful chairs were auctioned off to raise funds for the cause. Watch this video to find out more about the charity.
Margot Janse and her team of chefs put on a dazzling display, from the moment you entered the contemporary furniture store you were whisked away into another world. It was like Charlie and The Chocolate Factory for grown-ups. There was a wooden tree hung with tubes of truffle that instructed you to smear the paste onto porcini bark; a multitude of colourful textured  ‘balls’—filled with delicious intriguing centres; birds’ nests made out of fried potato, and, and…
Move away from the tree dripping with delicious treasures to a trough filed with edible soil, mushroom and beetroot sponge, buttermilk and Jerusalem artichoke soups in dainty glasses; and tin cans that once opened revealed a pickled ‘roll mop’; and much, much more. Guests were encouraged to literally graze and forage this garden of explosive colour.
The next stop on this food journey was to the cheese table, where a chef diligently shaved fungi-looking slivers of cheese, to be accompanied with fruits suspended in a flower vase like so many marbles. To accompany the cheese, slices of crescent toast hung on another tree made out of nails.
The last installation was a wall covered literally with dessert spoons; each one holding something sweet, like rough and textured edible rocks.
What a night!

Last night at Weylandts in Green Point was like walking into The Secret Garden of gourmet food. Guests were giving foraging gloves at the door to protect their hands and clothes and instructed literally to dig in!

IMG_0325

The night was a celebration of Dutch furniture designer Linteloo, who is also a benefactor of our charity Isabelo, where we feed 800 to 900 children a nutritional breakfast every day! Last night beautiful chairs were auctioned off to raise funds for the cause.  Find out more about the Isabelo Feeding Scheme.

Margot Janse and her team of chefs put on a dazzling display, from the moment you entered the contemporary furniture store you were whisked away into another world. It was like Charlie and The Chocolate Factory for grown-ups. There was a wooden tree hung with tubes of truffle that instructed you to smear the paste onto porcini bark; a multitude of colourful textured  ‘balls’—filled with delicious intriguing centres; birds’ nests made out of fried potato, and, and…

DSC_2326

Move away from the tree dripping with delicious treasures to a trough filed with edible soil, mushroom and beetroot sponge, buttermilk and Jerusalem artichoke soups in dainty glasses; and tin cans that once opened revealed a pickled ‘roll mop’; and much, much more. Guests were encouraged to literally graze and forage this garden of explosive colour.

The next stop on this food journey was to the cheese table, where a chef diligently shaved fungi-looking slivers of cheese, to be accompanied with fruits suspended in a flower vase like so many marbles. To accompany the cheese, slices of crescent toast hung on another tree made out of nails.

The last installation was a wall covered literally with dessert spoons; each one holding something sweet, like rough and textured edible rocks.

What a night!

Head over to our Facebook page for more photos.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Kids, Le Quartier Français, Margot Janse,
comment-notesComments: 1


  

Who’s the pest?

We spotted this insect-eresting menu depicted on a slideshow on Nowness.
“Moth mousse whipped with hazelnut milk, cricket broth with a side of grasshopper garum sauce and a liquorice-glazed ant stick reveal their unexpectedly delicious side in this still-life series by photographer Joss McKinley.’
a
Nowness reports that the Nordic Food Lab, created the ‘experimental menu as part of the Wellcome Collection’s Who’s the Pest? season, a collaboration with a mobile arts “Pestival” in celebration of all things six-legged’.
The Nordic Food Lab is run by René Redzepi of Noma, and sits in a houseboat across the harbour from his restaurant.
According to Nowness, it was ‘born out of Redzepi’s quest to tap into more local and underused ingredients, it is a forum in which chefs meet scientists, chemists and academics on a shared mission to explore the 1,400 untapped wholesome crawling creatures that are edible to man’.a

We spotted this insect-eresting menu depicted on a slideshow on Nowness.

pestival

“Moth mousse whipped with hazelnut milk, cricket broth with a side of grasshopper garum sauce and a liquorice-glazed ant stick reveal their unexpectedly delicious side in this still-life series by photographer Joss McKinley.’

Nowness reports that the Nordic Food Lab, created the ‘experimental menu as part of the Wellcome Collection’s Who’s the Pest? season, a collaboration with a mobile arts “Pestival” in celebration of all things six-legged’.

The Nordic Food Lab is run by René Redzepi of Noma, and sits in a houseboat across the harbour from his restaurant.

According to Nowness, it was ‘born out of Redzepi’s quest to tap into more local and underused ingredients, it is a forum in which chefs meet scientists, chemists and academics on a shared mission to explore the 1,400 untapped wholesome crawling creatures that are edible to man’.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Trends,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

How to set a table for Chinese New Year

How to set a table for Chinese New Year
Sunday, 10 February 2013 marks the Chinese New Year celebration. Whether you’re cooking an Asian feast or simply ordering takeout make sure you dress your table to impress.
The table cloth
The colour red is hugely symbolic in Chinese culture, it signifies life and all living things, so either use a red table cloth, or lay your table with Chinese newspapers and lay a red runner down the centre.
Prawn crackers
Sinfully delicious, these quintessential Chinese treats make beautiful table dressings too. Pile a bowl full of the colourful crackers in a red or black bowl.
Square Plates and Round Tea Cups
In China circles and squares are said to respectively represent heaven and earth. Brew a pot of jasmine tea to enjoy in the tea cups while feasting.
Red envelopes
On Chinese New Year it’s considered good luck to give a red envelope filled with money, normally to children, but for sake of the table setting place one on top of each napkin. Simply fold over red paper to make your own and adorn with a gold sticker (an image of a snake would be appropriate considering 2013 is Year of the Snake). Or buy one.

On Sunday, 10 February 2013 is the Chinese New Year celebration. Whether you’re cooking an Asian feast or simply ordering take-out make sure you dress your table to impress.

The table cloth
The colour red is hugely symbolic in Chinese culture, it signifies life and all living things, so either use a red table cloth, or lay your table with Chinese newspapers with a red runner down its centre.

Prawn crackers
Sinfully delicious, these quintessential Chinese treats make beautiful table dressings too. Pile the colourful crackers in a red or black bowl.

Square plates and round tea cups
In China circles and squares are said to respectively represent heaven and earth. Brew a pot of jasmine tea to enjoy in the tea cups while feasting.

Red envelopes
On Chinese New Year it’s considered good luck to give a red envelope filled with money, normally to children, but for sake of the table setting place one on top of each napkin.  To make your own simply fold over red paper and adorn with a gold sticker (an image of a snake would be appropriate considering 2013 is Year of the Snake). Or buy one.

chinese table setting

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Inspiration,
comment-notesComments: 0


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