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The next big trends in hotels

The Next Big Trends in Hotels
Condé Nast Traveller has gathered information of the hottest new trends in hotels from influential people in the business that will be setting the tone for interior design, food, architecture and wellness in 2014.
Francis Ford Coppola, hotelier and owner of the Palazzo Margherita in Bernalda, Basilicata, Italy gave insight into:
WHAT’S NEXT IN HOTELS
In with intimacy “Super-high-end travelers (especially those with families) are looking for luxury on a smaller scale now, almost akin to a yacht. When I was in South America, I noticed how some of the guests regarded with disdain all the suitcases and crowds of people who were checking in and out, and I realized how many travelers want more privacy and intimacy. It’s not good for a hotel to be too big. The highest level of the luxury market will even prefer a hotel small enough to be taken over by one or two families.”
Big-league bathrooms “One rule I have for my hotels is the bathrooms have to be better than what you have at home. There needs to be some practicality in design (like having enough space to keep products in the shower, for example, and not tripping over them on the floor). The next wave of bathrooms will be larger. In fact, many guests now want their own private bathrooms when traveling as a couple, so the next trend will be room configurations with two bathrooms for every room.”
While Andrew Tarlow, restaurateur and owner of Wythe Hotel’s Reynard in Brooklyn shared his thoughts on:
WHAT’S NEXT IN HOTEL FOOD
Community building “Hotels and their restaurants will become more seamless with the surrounding area. We’ll see less of a distinction between a hotel restaurant and a neighborhood hangout, with locals—not just hotel guests—spending time there. The hotel itself will become a community.”
Away with formality “We’ll continue to see hotel restaurants that are basically fine dining in terms of the quality of food and service but without the attributes we traditionally consider staples of ‘fine dining,’ like a sommelier, white tablecloths, multiple captains in the dining room, etc. All of this is becoming much less relevant, which is redefining what good service means. Our increasing desire to know where our food and wine come from is putting the focus on the quality and origin of the ingredients rather than on the formality of the room and service.”
For the rest of the trend predictions head on over to Condé Nast Traveller.

Condé Nast Traveller has gathered the hottest new trends in hotels that will be setting the tone for interior design, food, architecture and wellness in 2014 from influential people in the business

Francis Ford Coppola, hotelier and owner of the Palazzo Margherita in Bernalda, Basilicata, Italy gave insight into:

WHAT’S NEXT IN HOTELS
In with intimacy
“Super-high-end travelers (especially those with families) are looking for luxury on a smaller scale now, almost akin to a yacht. When I was in South America, I noticed how some of the guests regarded with disdain all the suitcases and crowds of people who were checking in and out, and I realized how many travelers want more privacy and intimacy. It’s not good for a hotel to be too big. The highest level of the luxury market will even prefer a hotel small enough to be taken over by one or two families.”

Big-league bathrooms “One rule I have for my hotels is the bathrooms have to be better than what you have at home. There needs to be some practicality in design (like having enough space to keep products in the shower, for example, and not tripping over them on the floor). The next wave of bathrooms will be larger. In fact, many guests now want their own private bathrooms when traveling as a couple, so the next trend will be room configurations with two bathrooms for every room.”

One of our many private and intimate suites

One of our many private and intimate suites

While Andrew Tarlow, restaurateur and owner of Wythe Hotel’s Reynard in Brooklyn shared his thoughts on:

WHAT’S NEXT IN HOTEL FOOD
Community building
“Hotels and their restaurants will become more seamless with the surrounding area. We’ll see less of a distinction between a hotel restaurant and a neighborhood hangout, with locals—not just hotel guests—spending time there. The hotel itself will become a community.”

Away with formality “We’ll continue to see hotel restaurants that are basically fine dining in terms of the quality of food and service but without the attributes we traditionally consider staples of ‘fine dining,’ like a sommelier, white tablecloths, multiple captains in the dining room, etc. All of this is becoming much less relevant, which is redefining what good service means. Our increasing desire to know where our food and wine come from is putting the focus on the quality and origin of the ingredients rather than on the formality of the room and service.”

We did away with our tablecloths a long time ago!

We did away with our tablecloths a long time ago!

For the rest of the trend predictions head on over to Condé Nast Traveller.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Hotel, Travel, Trends,
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