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Peux je prendre un café et un croissant? Or ‘Can I order a coffee and croissant?’
Wouldn’t it be grand to sit at a Paris sidewalk café and utter that magic phrase in French? These days anything is possible online. We’ve discovered an amazing, interactive site where you can learn a number of languages for free. The layout is easy to follow and the information is comprehensive. You can learn French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, German and more. Plus you don’t have to do it alone; you can invite friends to complete the modules with you.
Do we want to learn a new language for free? I think the answer can only be, Oui!

Peux je prendre un café et un croissant? Or ‘Can I order a coffee and croissant?’

Wouldn’t it be grand to sit at a side walk café in Paris and utter that magic phrase in French? These days anything is possible online. We’ve discovered an amazing, interactive site where you can learn a number of languages for free. The layout is easy to follow and the information is comprehensive. You can learn French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, German and more. Plus you don’t have to do it alone; you can invite friends to complete the modules with you.

Do we want to learn a new language for free? I think the answer can only be, Oui! Go to duolingo.com and get started!

french flag

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Inspiration,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Malik Bendjelloul chats to The New Yorker about Rodriguez

Malik Bendjelloul chats to The New Yorker about Rodriguez
As we all know by now Searching for Sugarman won an Oscar last night! We’re so, so pleased and think this accolade is richly deserved for a documentary that’s so close to the hearts of South Africans.
We did some digging and found an article from August 2012, in The New Yorker about the documentary and the man himself, Sixto Rodriguez.
Here’s an interview excerpt from the article.
You said you were taking tips, looking for stories, when you found out about Rodriguez.
I had been working for Swedish National TV, the SVT, on something called “Cobra,” an arts and cultural show that did stories like you’d find in The New Yorker. But in 2006, I quit and went backpacking, looking for stories with a camera. In six months, I went to sixteen countries: Ethiopia, all the countries in Central America, and a few countries in South America. I went to many places. I found quite a few pretty good stories, but this was the one I was like, “Wow, this is like a fairy tale, this is scripted, this sounds too good to be true.” I fell in love, very, very much. I’d never spent more than four weeks on story before, and I spent four years on this. Normally, I get a salary when I work. I didn’t get any salary for four years.
You sacrificed a lot for this movie.
It was very hard to finance, it really was. The music and the illustrations and the editing was done by myself, but it wasn’t on purpose. I don’t think you should do that. I think you should collaborate with professionals, but I couldn’t because I didn’t get any funding. I borrowed money from friends and family. I didn’t really buy clothes for the last two years.
Is anybody working on that trail of money that Rodriguez hasn’t seen?
Rodriguez today still sells gold in South Africa—only in the last five years he sold another gold disc, but that money does not go to Clarence Avant. It goes to another company in England, and someone should investigate what happens with that money. I spoke to a South African lawyer who solved the case of “The Lion Sleeps Tonight,” and he said, “Sure, we can solve this, but it will take three years and we will need some money because these things are difficult.”
I didn’t get too deep into what happens with Rodriguez’s record checks today, because the story is not really about money. We had a country during apartheid that was isolated, so we didn’t have any cultural exchange. The South African record labels didn’t search for him because they couldn’t bring him to South Africa anyway, it was a boycott. We had a guy who was living in a house without a telephone, which is not very common, and we had a time before the Internet, the third factor. I mean, there are a few factors that made this story happen and the money is only one of those factors, I think.
Have you figured out how many other people knew about this phenomenon?
We haven’t screened the film in South Africa, but there are South Africans that came to screenings. A South African told me, “Of course I knew all this already. I actually had this conversation with an American a few years ago.” He also said, “We were talking about something completely different, and I said, ‘That would be like the seventies without the Beatles, the Stones, and Rodriguez,’ and the American was like, ‘What did you just say?’ ” They talk about him in the same breath as those rock gods in South Africa.
Have people reached out to you that were part of that moment after the release of the movie?
There’s one story that’s pretty cool. In 1970, track number six on “Cold Fact” is called “Inner City Blues.” Next year, 1971, there’s an album by Marvin Gaye, called “What’s Goin’ On?,” released in Detroit. Track number nine is called “Inner City Blues.” On both those albums, you find the same guy, Bob Babbitt, an amazing bass player who just passed away two weeks ago. I called a year ago and asked him, “Is this a coincidence? Or did you tell Marvin Gaye the title of this completely unknown song?” He told me, and I think he was truthful, “I don’t remember anything. I don’t even remember Rodriguez.”
Go here to read the rest of the article.

As we all know by now Searching for Sugarman won an Oscar last night! We’re so, so pleased and think this accolade is richly deserved for a story that’s so close to the hearts of South Africans.

We did some digging and found an article from August 2012, in The New Yorker about the documentary and the man himself, Sixto Rodriguez.

Here’s an interview excerpt from the article.

searching for sugarman Oscar

You said you were taking tips, looking for stories, when you found out about Rodriguez.
I had been working for Swedish National TV, the SVT, on something called “Cobra,” an arts and cultural show that did stories like you’d find in The New Yorker. But in 2006, I quit and went backpacking, looking for stories with a camera. In six months, I went to sixteen countries: Ethiopia, all the countries in Central America, and a few countries in South America. I went to many places. I found quite a few pretty good stories, but this was the one I was like, “Wow, this is like a fairy tale, this is scripted, this sounds too good to be true.” I fell in love, very, very much. I’d never spent more than four weeks on story before, and I spent four years on this. Normally, I get a salary when I work. I didn’t get any salary for four years.

You sacrificed a lot for this movie.
It was very hard to finance, it really was. The music and the illustrations and the editing was done by myself, but it wasn’t on purpose. I don’t think you should do that. I think you should collaborate with professionals, but I couldn’t because I didn’t get any funding. I borrowed money from friends and family. I didn’t really buy clothes for the last two years.

Is anybody working on that trail of money that Rodriguez hasn’t seen?
Rodriguez today still sells gold in South Africa—only in the last five years he sold another gold disc, but that money does not go to Clarence Avant. It goes to another company in England, and someone should investigate what happens with that money. I spoke to a South African lawyer who solved the case of “The Lion Sleeps Tonight,” and he said, “Sure, we can solve this, but it will take three years and we will need some money because these things are difficult.”

I didn’t get too deep into what happens with Rodriguez’s record checks today, because the story is not really about money. We had a country during apartheid that was isolated, so we didn’t have any cultural exchange. The South African record labels didn’t search for him because they couldn’t bring him to South Africa anyway, it was a boycott. We had a guy who was living in a house without a telephone, which is not very common, and we had a time before the Internet, the third factor. I mean, there are a few factors that made this story happen and the money is only one of those factors, I think.

Have you figured out how many other people knew about this phenomenon?
We haven’t screened the film in South Africa, but there are South Africans that came to screenings. A South African told me, “Of course I knew all this already. I actually had this conversation with an American a few years ago.” He also said, “We were talking about something completely different, and I said, ‘That would be like the seventies without the Beatles, the Stones, and Rodriguez,’ and the American was like, ‘What did you just say?’ ” They talk about him in the same breath as those rock gods in South Africa.

Have people reached out to you that were part of that moment after the release of the movie?
There’s one story that’s pretty cool. In 1970, track number six on “Cold Fact” is called “Inner City Blues.” Next year, 1971, there’s an album by Marvin Gaye, called “What’s Goin’ On?,” released in Detroit. Track number nine is called “Inner City Blues.” On both those albums, you find the same guy, Bob Babbitt, an amazing bass player who just passed away two weeks ago. I called a year ago and asked him, “Is this a coincidence? Or did you tell Marvin Gaye the title of this completely unknown song?” He told me, and I think he was truthful, “I don’t remember anything. I don’t even remember Rodriguez.”

Go here to read the rest of the article.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Inspiration,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

The food photographer as a painter

The food photographer as a painter
Food is art, we’ve always known that! So you can imagine how we felt when we stumbled on this food photographer /stylist’s work who approaches the subject as he would a painting, and styles it as such.
Andrew Scrivani says his work is known for his ‘painterly style’. We love the moodiness and light.  See his blog SundaySpace for more.

Food is art, we’ve always known that! So you can imagine how we felt when we stumbled on this food photographer /stylist’s work who approaches the subject as he would a painting, and styles it as such.

Andrew Scrivani says his work is known for his ‘painterly style’. We love the moodiness and light.  See his blog Making SundaySauce for more.

pear sorbet

pancake

vegetables
Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Inspiration,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Win a bread-making experience at Bread & Wine!

Save some dough and enter our competition to win a bread-making experience at Bread & Wine on Môreson Wine Farm! The course kicks off in the morning and you’ll receive your very own apron, recipe book and ingredients. You’ll learn how to make four different types of dough including: focaccia, olive oil brown, sourdough and soda bread. While the scent of your freshly baking bread permeates the air, you’ll be taken on a tasting of Môreson’s premium wines. By now you’ll have worked up an appetite, luckily lunch at country chic restaurant Bread & Wine is on the cards! Enjoy a lip-smacking spread by Neil Jewell, accompanied by your very own breads.

Yes, we’re giving this experience away! Simply like Bread & Wine and Le Quartier Français on Facebook and share this competition, where you’ll find on both Facebook pages, to be in the running. Good luck!

comp 2

Upon arrival each participant will receive their very own apron, recipe book and ingredients
- Each participant will learn how to make four different types of dough including: focaccia, olive oil brown, sourdough and soda bread
- While these breads bake participants get to experience the phenomenal array of award-winning Môreson wines
- Following this tasting lunch is served at Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant accompanied by a selection of each participants baked breads
- Take-homes include: recipes and an apron.

We have plenty of other cooking courses on offer!

comment-notesComments:


  

Travel & Leisure 2013 World’s Best Awards Survey

If you love us please vote for us – it takes no time at all! Go on you can vote for a number of different experiences, hotels, operators etc. Don’t miss out.

Travel & Leisure 2013 World’s Best Awards Survey is open for votes! If you’ve stayed with us or visited our restaurant; and loved it, please vote for us. It’s simple: just go to the link and follow the instructions.  You can vote for a number of different experiences, hotels, operators, airlines and more. This is the guest’s opportunity to show us some love :) Plus you will be automatically be entered into a draw where you can win $10, 000 for a dream trip!

travel and leisure

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Awards, Le Quartier Français,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Good news for the Early Learning Centre in Franschhoek

There’s been a lot of bad news this week, so we thought we’d share some very special news to help shed some light.
One of our highly valued overseas guests has made an incredibly generous donation of $50,000 to our Early Learning Centre in Franschhoek.
This is the centre’s second year in operation and they have 64 children from 3 and 4 year olds to the integrated Grade R class of 5 year olds, in which both Xhosa and Afrikaans coloured children are educated together, with English as the overarching lingua franca. With Le Quartier Francais, Margot Janse and the kitchen team providing balanced daily meals to the underprivileged learners.
Director of Education, Jacquie Spiers of The Kusasa Project says: “The donation will go a long way to resourcing our new Grade 1 class of 2014 and to providing for a highly skilled teacher for this group. It will help to keep us sustainable and thereby ensure that we never fail these vulnerable children, who are the future of this beautiful but benighted land.”
So a HUGE & HAPPY THANK YOU, to our very kind anonymous benefactor.

There’s been a lot of bad news this week, so we thought we’d share some very special news to help shed some light. One of our highly valued overseas guests has made an incredibly generous donation of $50,000 to our Early Learning Centre in Franschhoek.

This is the centre’s second year in operation and they have 64 children from 3 and 4 year olds to the integrated Grade R class of 5 year olds, in which both Xhosa and Afrikaans coloured children are educated together. Le Quartier Français, Margot Janse and the kitchen team provide balanced daily meals to the underprivileged learners.

Director of Education, Jacquie Spiers of The Kusasa Project says: “The donation will go a long way to resourcing our new Grade 1 class of 2014 and to providing for a highly skilled teacher for this group. It will help to keep us sustainable and thereby ensure that we never fail these vulnerable children, who are the future of this beautiful but benighted land.”

kusasa eager readers red 1

So a HUGE & HAPPY THANK YOU, to our very kind anonymous benefactor.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Franschhoek, Kids, Le Quartier Français,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

One Billion Rising

Join us tomorrow on the front terrace of  Le Quartier Français between 5:00pm  and 5:30pm to support  ONE BILLION RISING.  WALK OUT, DANCE, RISE UP and DEMAND and end to this violence!

ONE BILLION RISING 2

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Uncategorized,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Uwe Pfaff Solo Exhibition at Is Art

We’ve long been fans of artist Uwe Pfaff, and we host a number of his sculptures throughout  Le Quartier Français (take a peek at the ones in The Tasting Room below).

uwe pfaff

Is Art, South African contemporary art gallery, adjacent to us is hosting an Uwe Pfaff Solo Exhibition from 10 February to 15 March.

Uwe Pfaff boasts a long, illustrious career. He grew up in Germany and immigrated to South Africa in 1970 where he worked as a design draughtsman for an air-conditioning company. He soon went on to take art classes and thereby discovering his love for metal and sculpture work. It hasn’t always been an easy path for this determined artist, but he persevered and is now world famous for his innovative works.

This exhibition hosts all new work, and is not to be missed. The gallery opens at 10am and closes at 5pm. Make a day out of it and pop into The Common Room for breakfast or lunch beforehand.

uwe

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Art, Franschhoek, Is Art,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Garden Tours with the Garden Guru

Garden Tours with the Garden Guru
“If you look the right way, you can see that the whole world is a garden.” – The Secret Garden
Franschhoek is alive with gardens bursting with fynbos, flowers and graceful oaks. Our gardens at Le Quartier Francais were designed by Sue Norman who still maintains it.  Join Sue, The Garden Guru, on a tour of Franschhoek’s most breath-taking gardens.
Visit the Babylonstoren’s spectacular formal garden spread out over eight acres. ‘The garden boasts over 300 varieties of plants and every one of them is edible.’
Then get enchanted at The Exotic Plant Company on Môreson: a kaleidoscope of orchids await, enjoy the vision with a glass of the farm’s bubbly before heading to Bread & Wine for lunch.
The tour ends with a walk through Boekenhoutskloof’s private gardens, a privilege very few people have got to experience.
For more information and to book your tour, visit our website.

“If you look the right way, you can see that the whole world is a garden.” – The Secret Garden

Franschhoek is alive with gardens bursting with fynbos, flowers and flourishing foliage. Our gorgeous gardens at Le Quartier Français were designed by Sue Norman.  Join Sue, The Garden Guru, on a tour of Franschhoek’s most breath-taking gardens.

Visit Babylonstoren’s spectacular formal garden (which is spread out over eight acres). ‘The garden boasts over 300 varieties of plants and every one of them is edible.’

Exotic-plant-company

Then get enchanted at The Exotic Plant Company on Môreson: a kaleidoscope of orchids await, enjoy the vision with a glass of the farm’s bubbly before heading to Bread & Wine for lunch.

The tour ends with a walk through Boekenhoutskloof’s private gardens, a privilege very few people have got to experience.

For more information and to book your tour, visit our website.

comment-notesComments: 0


  

How to set a table for Chinese New Year

How to set a table for Chinese New Year
Sunday, 10 February 2013 marks the Chinese New Year celebration. Whether you’re cooking an Asian feast or simply ordering takeout make sure you dress your table to impress.
The table cloth
The colour red is hugely symbolic in Chinese culture, it signifies life and all living things, so either use a red table cloth, or lay your table with Chinese newspapers and lay a red runner down the centre.
Prawn crackers
Sinfully delicious, these quintessential Chinese treats make beautiful table dressings too. Pile a bowl full of the colourful crackers in a red or black bowl.
Square Plates and Round Tea Cups
In China circles and squares are said to respectively represent heaven and earth. Brew a pot of jasmine tea to enjoy in the tea cups while feasting.
Red envelopes
On Chinese New Year it’s considered good luck to give a red envelope filled with money, normally to children, but for sake of the table setting place one on top of each napkin. Simply fold over red paper to make your own and adorn with a gold sticker (an image of a snake would be appropriate considering 2013 is Year of the Snake). Or buy one.

On Sunday, 10 February 2013 is the Chinese New Year celebration. Whether you’re cooking an Asian feast or simply ordering take-out make sure you dress your table to impress.

The table cloth
The colour red is hugely symbolic in Chinese culture, it signifies life and all living things, so either use a red table cloth, or lay your table with Chinese newspapers with a red runner down its centre.

Prawn crackers
Sinfully delicious, these quintessential Chinese treats make beautiful table dressings too. Pile the colourful crackers in a red or black bowl.

Square plates and round tea cups
In China circles and squares are said to respectively represent heaven and earth. Brew a pot of jasmine tea to enjoy in the tea cups while feasting.

Red envelopes
On Chinese New Year it’s considered good luck to give a red envelope filled with money, normally to children, but for sake of the table setting place one on top of each napkin.  To make your own simply fold over red paper and adorn with a gold sticker (an image of a snake would be appropriate considering 2013 is Year of the Snake). Or buy one.

chinese table setting

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Inspiration,
comment-notesComments: 0


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