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Franschhoek Festivals

Come summertime, Franschhoek is abuzz with festivals; here’s two not to miss at the tail end of 2012:

‘Magic of Bubbles’ Cap Classique & Champagne Festival (30 November - 2 December)
Local Cap Classique, and French Champagne producers will present their bubblies in a grand tent on the manicured lawns surrounding the Huguenot Monument.
Franschhoek Art in Clay (27 October - 16 November)
Go potty at six Franschhoek galleries showcasing their contemporary ceramics

magic of bubbles

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Festival, Franschhoek, Franschhoek Art in Clay, Uncategorized,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Stars, Food, Art

Stars, Food, Art  is a culinary event by luxury hotel group, Sofitel, which takes place in Munich, Lyon, Vienna, London, Dubai and Amsterdam. The latest is at Sofitel Legend The Grand Amsterdam, in Amsterdam: ‘Stars, Food & Art: The Global Edition’ on Friday and Saturday, 2 and 3 November 2012.

Margot Janse will be among the 11 international chefs who will be cooking their signature dishes. Plus, Margot has the additional honour, along with Claire Clark, of being the first women chefs to be ‘exhibiting their culinary creativity’ at the event.

The goal of Stars, Food, Art is to create an event where culture, food, wines and art are united.

starfoodart

During the dinner this year, artist Mariska Meijers will be presenting eleven ‘gigantic mosaic Christmas tree decorations’, each of which is said to represent one of the chefs.

We’re more than sure Margot will do us and South Africa proud.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Chefs, Margot Janse, Travel, stars food art,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Our Franschhoek insider tips

Our Franschhoek  insider tips:
Lunch at Bread and Wine Vineyard Restaurant—this is country cooking at another level entirely; rustic meets accomplished elegance. Ask to see the storage room of curing meats for a peek in to the charcuterie process. (Cooking classes with Neil Jewell are also available.)[http://www.moreson.co.za/bread-and-wine/]
A cookery class with Vanie Padayachee, The Spice Guru. The Indian culture is so prolific in South Africa—and this is one delicious way to learn more about it. [http://www.lqf.co.za/cooking-classes/cooking-with-spices.htm]
Cruise around The Franschhoek Motor Museum [http://www.fmm.co.za/]. Set in a beautiful wine estate, this museum is a tribute to 100 years of classic motoring.
Visit, is art, fine art gallery [http://www.is-art.co.za/] Think you’ve seen it all? This gallery offers a unique perspective on contemporary South African art.

Lunch at Bread and Wine Vineyard Restaurant—this is country cooking at another level entirely; rustic meets accomplished elegance. Ask to see the storage room of curing meats for a peek in to the charcuterie process. (Cooking classes with Neil Jewell are also available.)

A cookery class with Vanie Padayachee, The Spice Guru. The Indian culture is so prolific in South Africa—and this is one delicious way to learn more about it.

Cruise around The Franschhoek Motor Museum. Set in a beautiful wine estate, this museum is a tribute to 100 years of classic motoring.

Visit, is art, fine art gallery. Think you’ve seen it all? This gallery offers a unique perspective on contemporary South African art.

motormueseum

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Franschhoek, Uncategorized,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Hop to it

We have some new friends in the sculpture garden, by artist Guy du Toit.

bunny sculpture2

bunny sculpture

GUY DU TOIT was born in 1958 in Rustenburg in the North West Province. He has been consistently supported by private and public collectors, institutions, academics and fellow artists. He has been honoured with many awards and has in turn been invited to curate and adjudicate exhibitions.

The past few years have increasingly been spent on private and public commissions and in working closely with artists and businesses, especially those involved in design, communications, architecture, advertising and entertainment. Guy currently teaches part-time at the University of Pretoria and works full time from his new home and studio in Swavelpoort.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Art, Is Art,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Franschhoek Art in Clay

Go potty at this festival of ceramics - six Franschhoek galleries will be participating. It opens Saturday 27 October and ends 16 November. Here’s a sneak peak of some of the work we’ll be showing at is art.

Chris Smart

Bowl Three.jpg 300dpi

Chris Smart Goose Tea-pot

Annual feast of ceramics in six Franschhoek galleries

Opens Saturday 27 October – ends 16 Novemb
Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Art, Festival, Franschhoek, Franschhoek Art in Clay,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

The Spare Room

We have The Tasting Room, The Common Room – and now The Spare Room. No it’s not another restaurant, but simply a space we’ve converted overlooking our Indigenous and Unusual Herb and Sculpture Garden. It’s a place where the only limit is your imagination; from private dining events to pop-up champagne bars, and business meetings with style.

DSC_9260

DSC_9261

DSC_9262

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Le Quartier Français, The Spare Room,
comment-notesComments: 1


  

Franschhoek Open Gardens Festival

Daisy: What kind of a garden do you come from?
Alice: Oh, I don’t come from any garden.
Daisy: Do you suppose she’s a wildflower?
Franschhoek is a wonderland of gardens, from the fabulously formal to the rampant and wild. The Franschhoek Open Gardens Festival on the weekend of October 26, 27, 28 opens ten of the town’s most gorgeous gardens.
Tickets are R100 per person. See the gardens below. And, while you’re at it come for a stroll through sculpture garden, absolutely free of charge.

Daisy: What kind of a garden do you come from?

Alice: Oh, I don’t come from any garden.

Daisy: Do you suppose she’s a wildflower?

Franschhoek is a Wonderland  too, with its beautiful gardens; from the fabulously formal to the rampant and wild. The Franschhoek Open Gardens Festival on the weekend of October 26, 27, 28 opens ten of the town’s most gorgeous gardens.

open-gardens-300x247

And, while you’re at it come for a stroll through our sculpture garden, absolutely free of charge.

DSC_9264

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Festival, Franschhoek,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Salt of the earth

Salt of the earth
Margot Janse uses a procession of uniquely African ingredients in The Tasting Room, from baobab to buchu. The most simple of all ingredients, salt, is no different.
Sourced from a mineral hot spring in the Lowveld known as Baleni it’s one of the last places in Southern Africa where non-mechanised salt production still takes places.
Every winter groups of local women hand-harvest small amounts for their own use as well as to supplement their income
The process is deeply rooted in the metaphysical, spurred on by the warm water, rising bubbles and sulphurous smell of the swamp. A spirit medium determines the day on which salt production will start. Then, salt-makers place offerings and libations at the foot of a dead leadwood tree on the edge of the swamp into which the spring flows.

Chef Margot Janse uses a procession of uniquely African ingredients in The Tasting Room, from baobab to buchu. The most simple of all ingredients, salt, is no different.

Sourced from a mineral hot spring in the Lowveld known as Baleni it’s one of the last places in Southern Africa where non-mechanised salt production still takes places. Every winter groups of local women hand-harvest small amounts for their own use as well as to supplement their income.

salt

The process is deeply rooted in the metaphysical, spurred on by the warm water, rising bubbles and sulphurous smell of the swamp. A spirit medium determines the day on which salt production will start. Then, salt-makers place offerings and libations at the foot of a dead leadwood tree on the edge of the swamp into which the spring flows.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Food, Ingredients, Margot Janse, The Tasting Room,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

Our new sign

Look, we’re all grown up.

DSC_9269

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Franschhoek, Le Quartier Français,
comment-notesComments: 0


  

The future looks golden for Chardonnay at Môreson

“We’re moving forward into the future with Chardonnay,” says winemaker Clayton Reabow.
Clayton addresses these prophetic words to the assembled gaggle of wine lovers at Bread & Wine. We’ve been invited to a tasting of Môreson’s new vintages paired with a smorgasbord from chef Neil Jewell. As a precursor to the event we’re being treated to a special tasting of three golden girls; a bubbly, a 2010 Chardonnay, and a straw wine made solely from Chardonnay grapes. “The idea,” continues Clayton “is to start building a portfolio based around the grape.”
“This Méthode Cap Classique,’ he says holding a golden flute up to the light, “shows the length of our local bubbly, and it’s a move away from secondary characteristics. I’m a firm believer in fresh sparkling wines that are allowed to mature and naturally pick up other flavours—and to not smell like bread and yeast immediately.” The bubbly is a 2005 vintage Blanc de Blanc—pure Chardonnay goodness.
The next wine is a showstopper. A 2010 Chardonnay called FYM (Foxtrot Yankee Mike), named for ‘Richard’s passion for flying and chardonnay’. Made with100% new oak the wine can age for 5 to 10 years in the bottle. Only 100 cases have been made of this special wine.
“This one’s a bit of an enigma,” says Clayton, we moved onto the dessert wine now. “We set ourselves a challenge; a sticky made from Chardonnay grapes doesn’t usually work…” The straw wine was made with Chardonnay grapes, from a 25-year-old vineyard, which were desiccated on the vine.
Starters are spiralling out of the kitchen now; pale pink sardine sorbet in a parmesan cone matches the Môreson Sauvignon Blanc 2012 like a dream. Cured salmon belly with crispy skin and cucumber foam follows, paired with Môreson Dr Reason Why 2012. The unwooded Chardonnay tastes of vanilla and lime.
Next up is a casual affair of artisan baguette, which is baked on the property, served with saussison sec (the sausage is also cured in-house), and beurre noisette (burnt butter) – all this is washed down with Môreson Premium Chardonnay 2011; a meal in itself it’s so utterly rich and decadent.
We move onto the reds; Môreson Pinotage 2011 paired with quail drumsticks and sweet breads, Môreson Mata Mata 2010 is an indulgent match for cardamom salami and oxtail bone marrow gratin.
The meal is wound up with the silky Môreson Magia 2007 (Bordeaux blend) and a punchy Caesar salad. Fast on its heels is the estate’s seductive Môreson Cabernet Franc 2010 paired with spice-infused dark chocolate truffles.
Visit their website for more information on Môreson wines as well as on Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant.

“We’re moving forward into the future with Chardonnay,” says winemaker Clayton Reabow.

Clayton addresses these prophetic words to the assembled gaggle of wine lovers at Bread & Wine. We’ve been invited to a tasting of Môreson’s new vintages paired with a smorgasbord from chef Neil Jewell. As a precursor to the event we’re being treated to a special tasting of three golden girls; a bubbly, a 2010 Chardonnay, and a straw wine made solely from Chardonnay grapes. “The idea,” continues Clayton “is to start building a portfolio based around the grape.”

DSC_9200

“This Méthode Cap Classique,’ he says holding a golden flute up to the light, “shows the length of our local bubbly, and it’s a move away from secondary characteristics. I’m a firm believer in fresh sparkling wines that are allowed to mature and naturally pick up other flavours—and to not smell like bread and yeast immediately.” The bubbly is a 2005 vintage Blanc de Blanc—pure Chardonnay goodness.

The next wine is a showstopper. A 2010 Chardonnay called FYM (Foxtrot Yankee Mike), named for ‘Richard’s passion for flying and Chardonnay’. Made with 100% new oak the wine can age for 5 to 10 years in the bottle. Only 100 cases have been made of this special wine.

“This one’s a bit of an enigma,” says Clayton, we moved onto the dessert wine now. “We set ourselves a challenge; a sticky made from Chardonnay grapes doesn’t usually work…” The straw wine was made with Chardonnay grapes, from a 25-year-old vineyard, which were desiccated on the vine, and the wine has incredible depth of fruit.

DSC_9203

Starters are spiralling out of the kitchen now; pale pink sardine sorbet in a Parmesan cone matches the Môreson Sauvignon Blanc 2012 like a dream. Cured salmon belly with crispy skin and cucumber foam follows, paired with Môreson Dr Reason Why 2012. The unwooded Chardonnay tastes of vanilla and lime.

DSC_9207

Next up is a casual affair of artisan baguette, which is baked on the property, served with saussison sec (the sausage is also cured in-house), and beurre noisette (burnt butter) – all this is washed down with Môreson Premium Chardonnay 2011; a meal in itself it’s so utterly rich and decadent.

DSC_9214

We move onto the reds; Môreson Pinotage 2011 paired with quail drumsticks and sweet breads, Môreson Mata Mata 2010 is an indulgent match for cardamom salami and oxtail bone marrow gratin.

DSC_9220

The meal is wound up with the silky Môreson Magia 2007 (Bordeaux blend) and a punchy Caesar salad. Fast on its heels is the estate’s seductive Môreson Cabernet Franc 2010 paired with spice-infused dark chocolate truffles.

DSC_9225

Visit their website for more information on Môreson wines as well as on Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant.

Posted by: Susan Huxter
Posted in: Bread & Wine Vineyard Restaurant, Franschhoek, Môreson, Neil Jewell, Wine,
comment-notesComments: 0


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